Crazy author Pete Earley (E–book)


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  1. says: Crazy author Pete Earley (E–book) characters · eBook or Kindle ePUB ↠ Pete Earley Pete Earley ↠ 3 free read

    Crazy author Pete Earley (E–book) 45 starsI recently read and reviewed a book similar to this one about America's incarceration of large numbers of mentally ill individuals Insane America's Criminal Treatment of Mental Illness by Alisa Roth My review this book 'Crazy A Father's Search Through America's Mental Health Madness' Pete Earley writes ab

  2. says: free read Crazy author Pete Earley characters · eBook or Kindle ePUB ↠ Pete Earley Pete Earley ↠ 3 free read

    Crazy author Pete Earley (E–book) When I heard that my city was going to read this book One Book One Community gosh I got all excited People with chronic me

  3. says: Crazy author Pete Earley (E–book)

    Crazy author Pete Earley (E–book) A sad sad investigation into the mental health system that is charged with serving one of the most destitute populations in the United States the mentally ill He brings a nice mixture of historical context personal story and

  4. says: Pete Earley ↠ 3 free read characters · eBook or Kindle ePUB ↠ Pete Earley Crazy author Pete Earley (E–book)

    Crazy author Pete Earley (E–book) For such a keenly personal story Earley's writing is very dry and not compelling He is first and foremost a journalist so maybe that's to be expected When I heard of this title I didn't know it presented two dove

  5. says: Pete Earley ↠ 3 free read characters · eBook or Kindle ePUB ↠ Pete Earley free read Crazy author Pete Earley

    free read Crazy author Pete Earley Crazy author Pete Earley (E–book) Pete Earley ↠ 3 free read Contrary to a negative review you might read at goodreads if you have anyone close to you suffering with mental illness I would highly recommend this book It was recommended to me by a police officer who was greatly helped in thinking through this tragic issue And the author Pete Early is not too close to the issue to be objective it is a

  6. says: free read Crazy author Pete Earley Crazy author Pete Earley (E–book) characters · eBook or Kindle ePUB ↠ Pete Earley

    Pete Earley ↠ 3 free read Crazy author Pete Earley (E–book) As a psychiatrist reading this book I feel ashamed I'm ashamed I can't help people because the laws prevent it and ashamed I have to

  7. says: characters · eBook or Kindle ePUB ↠ Pete Earley Pete Earley ↠ 3 free read Crazy author Pete Earley (E–book)

    Crazy author Pete Earley (E–book) characters · eBook or Kindle ePUB ↠ Pete Earley One cliché about the rise and fall of a family’s wealth is “from shirt sleeves to shirt sleeves in three generations” The treatment of the seriously mentally ill in the United States could be similarly described as “from naked in the jail cell to naked in the jail cell in two centuries” In the early 19th century the Reverend Louis Dwight found in a Boston jail an insane prisoner who was naked in a jail cell

  8. says: Crazy author Pete Earley (E–book) Pete Earley ↠ 3 free read

    Crazy author Pete Earley (E–book) Pete Earley ↠ 3 free read As a mental health provider I agree with the idea behind Kendra’s Law although I have never seen it in practice

  9. says: Crazy author Pete Earley (E–book) Pete Earley ↠ 3 free read

    free read Crazy author Pete Earley Pete Earley ↠ 3 free read characters · eBook or Kindle ePUB ↠ Pete Earley WowThis book opened another world for me the world of mental illness I never knew for one that mental illness can begin during periods of stress such as that experienced graduating from high school or college I never knew that legislation can protect an individual's rights to the point that parents can not get help for their mentally ill young adults Basically if a schizophrenic is in denial of his disease he can refuse medication

  10. says: Crazy author Pete Earley (E–book)

    Crazy author Pete Earley (E–book) Not at all a bad overview of the politics of mental health and specifically moving factions of patients' rights vs families' right to get a person labeled incapable of making medical decisions for themselves as well as where we physically put the chronically and criminally mentally ill in this country Earley is extremely thorough to

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  • Audio CD
  • Crazy author Pete Earley
  • Pete Earley
  • English
  • 02 May 2020
  • 9781400132560

free read Crazy author Pete Earley

review Crazy author Pete Earley Ñ eBook or Kindle ePUB Ity he shadowed inmates and patients; interviewed correctional officers public defenders prosecutors judges mental health professionals and the police; talked with parents siblings and spouses; consulted historians civil rights lawyers and legislators The result is both a remarkable piece of investigative journalism and a wake up call a portrait that could serve as a snapshot of any community in America. One clich about the rise and fall of a family s wealth is from shirt sleeves to shirt sleeves in three generations The treatment of the seriously mentally ill in the United States could be similarly described as from naked in the jail cell to naked in the jail cell in two centuries In the early 19th century the Reverend Louis Dwight found in a Boston jail an insane prisoner who was naked in a jail cell without furniture though with a comfy pile of dirty straw In the early 21st century author and former Washington Post reporter Pete Earley found in the Miami Dade County Pretrial Detention Center henceforth the Miami jail found that those mentally ill prisoners who had attempted suicide were kept naked in a cell furnished with sink toilet and a hard plastic bed without bedding Earley came to write about the relationship between the criminal justice system and mental illness because of his son Mike Mike started having psychotic episodes while in college in New York Despite these episodes he managed to graduate from college During one psychotic episode Earley found out that unless a person is a danger to himself or herself or to others they can t be forcibly committed to treatment During a later episode during a long Labor Day weekend in Virginia Mike broke at random into the home a nearby family The family was out of town which was fortunate because Mike might well have shot if the family had been in residence He rifled through their stuff drank some of their liuor turned on and left on various water taps which caused damage to the house when the water overflowed pissed on the carpets and took a bubble bath The police found him in the house and with the help of a police dog managed with difficulty to subdue him Immediately after the offense Earley falsely claimed that Mike had threatened him to get Mike involuntarily committed for 5 days Being admitted however did not mean that Mike had to take any medicine thanks to a 1970s Supreme Court decision he had the right to refuse treatment Further the state of Virginia provided Mike with a defense attorney whose job was to get Mike uncommitted Surprisingly Earley was able to talk her into speaking with Mike and she managed to convince him to be voluntarily committed Writing the book was the way Earley dealt with Mike s illness He wanted to cover a broader canvas than only his son s illness He picked the Miami jail to study because the city has a larger proportion of mentally ill persons than most and because he was put in contact with a Steven Leifman a judicial reformer interested in mental health issues One major reason that the mentally ill end up in jail now is because the number of places in state mental hospitals has drastically decreased Mental hospitals were established in 19th century America thanks to the efforts of reformer Dorothea L Dix who after seeing in 1845 how insane inmates were treated in the Boston jail led a campaign to treat rather than punish the mentally ill Despite Dix s objectives in practice the old mental hospitals were warehouses where inmates were poorly feed poorly clothed and treated inhumanely little or no treatment occurred It was too easy to commit people to these institutions Starting in the 1960s inmates were released from these hospitals due to a combination of a new drug new attitudes new law and most importantly to save the state government s money The new drug was thorazine the first effective anti psychotic The new attitudes were expressed by the doctors Ronald David Laing author of the Divided Self and Thomas Szasz author of the Myth of Mental Illness they basically didn t believe in the notion of mental illness In the 1960s attorneys started suing states for the mistreatment of mental patients The basic legal doctrine was worked out by Dr Morton Birnbaum in 1959 who actually wanted and still wants to have the mentally ill treated not dumped on the streets He argued in an American Bar Association article that the patients in state mental hospitals had a constitutional right to treatment As the facilities were warehouses rather than medical facilities no treatment occurred Most people had been involuntarily committed and they were going to remain there until they got better which was hard to do without treatment Keeping people locked up without treatment violated the patient s 5th amendment right to due process Therefore Birnbaum concluded the patients either had to be treated or released Unfortunately for Birnbaum three of the lawyers he worked with in a 1970 Alabama case Charles Halpern Paul Friedman and Bruce Ennis wanted all the mental hospitals closed because they thought conditions could never be permanently improved These lawyers established in Washington D C what is now called the Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law These are the folks who made it hard to get the mentally ill forcibly treated or committed Faced with the demand to either treat mental patients properly which would have cost money or let them out states uickly decided that letting them out was much cheaper Because the federal government would now provide the mentally ill with financial support Medicaid Supplemental Security Income Social Security Disability Insurance etc the states could get away with it According to statistics on pages 2 and 3 in 1955 there were 560000 people in these facilities now there are 55000 However there are now 300000 mental ill prisoners in prisons or jails The population of Miami has a larger proportion of mentally ill persons than any other urban area in the United States In addition the drug companies could argue that the new anti psychotics made the hospitals less necessary However the early drugs did not help everyone and these drugs had drastic side effects Because few of the community mental health services promised in 1963 federal legislation appeared the mentally ill often ended up on the streets and then subseuently in jail However even if the community mental health centers were well funded the basic psychological and legal problem would remain many people with psychoses believe that they don t need their drugs and the law makes it hard to force them to take them The narrative moves between what Earley learned in Miami and how he and Mike dealt with Mike s illness and charges Earley apologized to the family but the wife especially wanted Mike to go to prison and hence pressed charges and Mike had done enough damage to be charged with two felony counts which on paper but not in practice see below could have lead to 5 year sentences each Thanks mainly to luck the wife who wanted Mike convicted of a felony didn t show up to the hearing so the prosecutor was willing to deal Mike was able to plead guilty to two misdemeanors rather than the felony counts Ironically the plea bargain resulted in stringent conditions longer period of parole reuired treatment etc than Mike would have faced if he had pled guilty to the felony counts in Fairfax county a first time offender convicted of Mike s crimes was going to get probation not prison But by pleading guilty to misdemeanors rather than felonies Mike still has the chance for an economically prosperous life if he can keep taking his medications During his treatment after the hearing Mike and Earley gradually learned that admitting to having a mental illness is a bad idea when searching for a job even if one is stable and continuing treatment You won t be hired because if a company knowingly hires someone with a mental illness and the employee hurts someone during a psychotic episode on the job the company can be liable The misdemeanors provided they don t involve drugs violence or theft are less of a hurdleIn Miami Earley broadened his study from the mentally ill actually in jail to who families cope with the mentally ill He talked with two women Rachel Diaz and Judy Robinson who ware leaders in the lcal chapter of the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill NAMI Diaz had a mentally ill husband and Robinson has a mentally ill son who had been arrested than 40 times One of Robinson s goals was to get the Miami Dade to establish a Crisis Intervention Team CIT basically a group of officers who spend a few weeks learning how to deal with the mentally ill in a fashion which leaves everyone alive From Robinson s interactions with her son Earley also learns that dealing with a mentally ill relative can be a constant struggle often one does not reach a point where the person is on effective medications and knows to keep taking them In Miami Earley also met with Steven Leifman a local elected judge who had gotten the various agencies who dealt with the mentally ill to talk to talk other and who had also created a diversion program that got those mentally ill who were charged with misdemeanors diverted from jail to a treatment program Unfortunately most of the mentally ill are charged with felonies rather than misdemeanors It was due to Leifman s influence that Earley was able to spend time in the Miami jail observing the treatment of the mentally ill and shadow some inmates after their release A basic problem keeping them on their medications Leifman s current goal is to get a separate dedicated facility for the mentally ill prisoners using a recently passed bond issue as fundingEarley also met with Susan Wagner the sister of Deidra Sanbourne Sanbourne was the patient in the 1980s lawsuit which got most of the patients out of the then horrific Florida mental hospitals This case is filled with ironies First the lawyer in charge of the suit for what is now the Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law Alice Nelson had been a social worker before being a lawyer and knew that simply letting the patients out was a disaster She wanted the hospitals fixed not closed Also Nelson and everyone else on the legal team eventually realized that Deidra Sanbourne was no longer capable of functioning outside of an institution Sanbourne was expecting the lawsuit to result in her having a good life on the outside However governor Lawton Chiles didn t want to spend the money to fix the hospitals and was able to successfully stall until 1993 until the plaintiffs won a face saving settlement in which Florida agreed to spend 3 million to open some drop in centers for mentally ill and to also make some fixes to the hospital Sanbourne was left in the hospital But Sanbourne did get out in 2001 after the hospital was privatized A treatment plan for life outside was devised and she was put in an assisted living facility ALF These facilities are basically boarding houses paid by the state house the mentally ill and hand out the medications The staff are not trained the staff can t force the patients to take their medications assuming they give them the right drugs in the first place and the patients can wander off No effort is made to follow the treatment plan which in Sanbourne s case was totally unrealistic In general I would deem the conditions at these places unsuitable for my cat Outside the hospital after only two weeks Sanbourne fell into a pattern of not taking her medications being re hospitalized being released being hospitalized again and so on Finally in 2003 after a recent hospital release she injured herself was admitted to a hospital and died of a bowel obstruction For a month her sister had been unable to find Sanbourne Wagner found out where she was only when Sanbourne was already on life support The privatized mental hospital not where Sanbourne died from which she had been released put up a plaue in her honor State laws are gradually changing to make it easier to forcibly commit or treat the chronically mentally ill generally one death at a time E Fuller Torrey a psychiatrist used funding from Ted and Vada Stanley a rich couple who have a son with successfully treated bipolar disorder to establish the Treatment Advocacy Center to push for making involuntary treatment or commitment easier Kendra s Law passed in New York in 1999 was their first success Laws are changed when enough people are killed by seriously mentally ill persons I realize that the point of this book is to highlight the plight of the mentally ill who end up in jail or in prison but I was concerned especially given the conditions described in the Miami Dade County Pretrial Detention Center about the apparent lack of concern with ordinary inmates If for example Mike had been a meth addict and the break in of course I doubt he would have taken a bubble bath in that case had been his first offense would it then have been acceptable to ruin the rest of his life by convicting him of a felony Certainly some jail time would be appropriate in that circumstance given the presumption that he would have known what he was doing was a crime From the description Earley gives of the jail see page 42 it doesn t sound like a safe place with violence towards prisoners coming from both other prisoners and also the corrections officers From other reading I ve learned there are now over 2000000 prisoners in America up from about 200000 in the early 1970s Most of these people are going to get out Do you really want to expose them to conditions that may make them worse At the end of book Earley has a list of solutions He thinks that every police department should create a Crisis Intervention Team the re establishment of humane state mental hospitals funding of community mental health centers for those who are not chronically mentally ill and changing state laws to make involuntary commitment easier and to make it easier to force people to take their medications He favors a less adversarial process which would allow the patient s relatives and doctors to be involved in the decision making I don t think he means that the clock should be moved all the way back to the committment procedures of the 1950s Without disagreeing with these recommendations which mirror the view of several books I ve recently read by psychiatrists and doctors who deal with the mentally ill I think even if they were implemented the lives of severely mentally ill would still be bad From his own experience with his son Earley knows that employers don t want to hire the mentally ill The existing drugs have unpleasant side effects and from talking to Robinson s son Earley learned the drugs sometimes merely damp down the symptoms hearing voices and so on to a socially acceptable level without eliminating them Those suffering from bipolar disorder or schizophrenia often cannot make friends or have successful romantic relationships and hence are often very lonely Given the difficulty of getting and holding jobs they often end up living on various forms of government support in a crappy apartment in a bad neighborhood These latter considerations make me considerably less enthusiastic than Earley is of the Passageway program in Miami because that is essentially what it achieves in the best cases

characters · eBook or Kindle ePUB ↠ Pete EarleyCrazy author Pete Earley

review Crazy author Pete Earley Ñ eBook or Kindle ePUB Pete Earley had no idea He'd been a journalist for over thirty years and the author of several award winning even bestselling nonfiction books about crime and punishment and society Yet he'd always been on the outside looking in He had no idea what it was like to be on the inside looking out until his son Mike was declared mentally ill and Earley was thrown headlong into the maze of contradictions dispa. A sad sad investigation into the mental health system that is charged with serving one of the most destitute populations in the United States the mentally ill He brings a nice mixture of historical context personal story and investigative journalism together to create a powerful narrative I am both personally and professionally interested in the topic since I am a Clinical Social Worker that works with the population he targets in the book One note he is a big proponent of providing treatment to mentally ill people even against their will when they are psychotic because they are not thinking clearly and will benefit from the decision in the long run While I love the book this does a slight disservice to the people who actually have to decide in the moment what constitutes psychosis clarity of thought intent to harm selfothers and generally bizarre behavior It also assumes that everyone gets better with treatment I found myself in an interesting position when reading this book I understood and have experienced the breaks in the system that he was talking about and investigating and yet I cannot wholeheartedly buy into the changes he is advocating at least not on the full scale I have made decisions to have someone helped against hisher will and I have allowed people to remain the community who were clearly not able to care themselves or others All I can say is it is definitely not as clear cut as this book would have it be There are so many gradations of sick and well Do we commit people with a history of mental illness who stop taking their medication When do we commit them What if medication never works Should they be held in a hospital forever Or some other environment This book is a necessary and important resource in beginning the conversation but I believe it can also go much deeper than what is found in this bookHaving said all that I urge everyone to read it It provides a real and informational view into the history of the US mental health system and the pain that accompanies people who have mental health problems and their families Sorry this is so long After the Falls run While I love the book this does a slight disservice to the people who actually have to decide in the moment what constitutes psychosis clarity of thought intent to harm selfothers and generally bizarre behavior It also assumes that everyone gets better with treatment I found myself in an interesting position when Then the Americans Came Voices from Vietnam reading this book I understood and have experienced the breaks in the system that he was talking about and investigating and yet I cannot wholeheartedly buy into the changes he is advocating at least not on the full scale I have made decisions to have someone helped against hisher will and I have allowed people to Hell in a Handbasket Devilish Debutantes #2 remain the community who were clearly not able to care themselves or others All I can say is it is definitely not as clear cut as this book would have it be There are so many gradations of sick and well Do we commit people with a history of mental illness who stop taking their medication When do we commit them What if medication never works Should they be held in a hospital forever Or some other environment This book is a necessary and important Say Your Abc With Me resource in beginning the conversation but I believe it can also go much deeper than what is found in this bookHaving said all that I urge everyone to The Outcast Dead read it It provides a ಅಮ್ಮಾವ್ರ ಗಂಡ real and informational view into the history of the US mental health system and the pain that accompanies people who have mental health problems and their families Sorry this is so long

Pete Earley ↠ 3 free read

review Crazy author Pete Earley Ñ eBook or Kindle ePUB Rities and catch 22s that is America's mental health system The Earley dug the he uncovered the bigger picture Our nation's prisons have become our new mental hospitals Crazy tells two stories The first is his son's The second describes what Earley learned during a yearlong investigation inside the Miami Dade County jail where he was given complete unrestricted access There and in the surrounding commun. Contrary to a negative review you might read at goodreads if you have anyone close to you suffering with mental illness I would highly recommend this book It was recommended to me by a police officer who was greatly helped in thinking through this tragic issue And the author Pete Early is not too close to the issue to be objective it is a very helpful expose of problems on many sides of what the subtitle rightly labels America s Mental Health MadnessUnder the over corrective guise of civil liberties and personal rights genuine and true concerns there is now a protocol and system that ties the hands of physicians psychiatrists family members and workers in the dangerously small field of mental health so that loved ones impaired and traumatized by admitted irrationality and psychosis cannot be helped they can only be uarantined temporarily often with virtually no real care just warehousing at best but very uickly released to the streets unless they commit a crime which many do then they can hang a while in a jail cell all the while unmedicated untreated possibly transferred to a mental health institution where they still have to agree to any medication nothing can ever be forced unless of course their psychosis drives them to harmful resistance or threatening actions Thus you have this revolving game of mental chairs a play on musical chairs where people we love are shuffled round and round through jails relatives homes who are naive enough or foolish enough or brave enough to house them for a while then on the street then back in jail then maybe in a psych ward Sometimes helped a little but the cycle repeating itself ad nauseam and accidents suicide abuse homelessness drug addiction rape all these good ends rather than help in a hospital or care facility trained to persevere in this difficult overwhelming workThere are no easy answers But this book not only informs you of some of the bleak realities in the messed up system that prevails currently it ends up identifying a few substantive helps that we may be able to continue to refine and develop to help those trapped in delusional worlds The common mistake of over correction to past evils in abusive and coercive asylums has now put us in a situation where there is very little that can be done for those suffering with mental illnesses It s a heart breaking book it s real it matches much of what I have seen in dealing with this tragic reality in our families my wife s and mine it lacks a spiritual perspective I knew that going into it but not all who are spiritual have sound answers either Christ hasn t promised to heal all our diseases regardless of their makeup in the complex matrix of psychosomatic origins or causes This book is an accurate testimony to the teaching of Scripture though the author is not intending this that we live in a cursed and broken world There are no guarantees We cry and work as hard as we can to help the people we love We thank God for every good thing we enjoy while we have it to enjoy and we seek to truly love others seeking what is best for them even if they dislike it or us at the time we do it for their good Read the book especially if you have someone you love suffering from diagnosed bi polar disease depression schizophrenia or the mix of schizoaffective disorder or whatever other labels they come up with Let this information fuel your pursuit of greater understanding and I hope that widespread concern leads to compassionate and sensible care for those who really don t think they have much of a problem Terrific book